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Lincoln Mark 7 Air to Coil Spring Conversion Kit!

2010 June 21

If you have a Lincoln Mark 7, 8, Continental, Town Car, or any other air suspension vehicle. You have probably thought before that you love your car, but you just wish it didn’t have so many Lincoln Mark VII air suspension problems. Whether it be a leak, sensor, or compressor it is always expensive. If there was only a way to eliminate your air suspension completely, well there actually is.

I found out about this awesome solution when I had some problems with my 1989 Lincoln Mark 7. It had a V8 and a manual transmission, and was a really clean car. The suspension started getting spongy on me and acting strange. I decided that I should fix the problem before it got worse or even unsafe. I found out about a kit that will take away all your air suspension troubles. Another common problem is the 1998 Lincoln town car air suspension

The solution is simple air suspension conversion, that will completely replace your air suspension system. You will no longer have to worry about leaking air bags, lines, tanks, or compressor or sensor problems. With the use of this kit you will experience the classic coil spring suspension system, which is one of the most common and reliable systems.

82-88 Lincoln Continental Air Lift 1000 Rear Air Spring Kit!

2010 June 14

Rigid steel factory suspensions allow load hauling capacity, but you have to sacrifice a smooth ride. Smooth ride suspensions can’t carry heavy loads; heavy springs ride rough, especially when your Continental is unloaded.

So why not have both great hauling ability and a smooth ride? Air Lift 1000 adjustable air springs solve both problems by allowing you to tune your Lincoln Continental suspension under all load and road conditions. Just add air when towing or hauling and then remove air for a softer ride when unloaded.

Worn tires can affect your car’s fuel efficiency and steering response. They can even introduce safety issues. That’s the reason it is critical that you ensure they’re in good condition. Otherwise, you might place yourself, your passengers, and other drivers and pedestrians at risk.

There are several factors that can contribute to prematurely worn treads. Each one causes a slightly different type of wearing that should be distinguishable by sight. In this article, we’ll take a closer look at identifying the problem. I’ll also describe some of the most common reasons tires wear down ahead of schedule.

Most tires that are sold today have bars integrated in the grooves. These bars are used to identify how far the treads have worn. If the bars are exposed, that means your tire has experienced wearing to the point that it should be replaced.

Many drivers are unaware these wear bars exist. In their defense, some wheels are not equipped with them. Fortunately, you can use a penny to easily determine whether the treads are worn too far. Stick a penny into the grooves with Abraham Lincoln’s head turned upside down. If the top of his head becomes hidden, that’s a sign your treads still have life in them. If you can see Lincoln’s entire head, you need to buy replacements.

The tie rod ends that are a part of your steering linkage system can become worn over time. When they wear down, the toe can eventually become misaligned. This is also the case in the event the tie rod ends become bent.

In a rack and pinion system, the inner tie rod ends are hard to inspect because they’re enclosed in plastic or rubber bellows. That said, you can test the steering by putting your vehicle in “park” and turning the steering wheel back and forth while a friend inspects the play. If there is looseness, that strongly suggests a problem with the toe alignment.

Your Lincoln Continental suspension system relies heavily on coil and leaf springs to keep the frame of the vehicle properly elevated. Like other components, the springs gradually wear down. When that happens, your car’s frame lowers during operation. This creates a problem with your wheel alignment – specifically, camber and caster. Left unresolved, it will gradually cause your treads to wear down prematurely.

The struts and shocks of your suspension system can also cause a problem. When they become worn, your vehicle will bounce up and down excessively during operation. That can cause cupping, a form of wear that looks like dipping on one side of the wheel.

Over inflation and under inflation can both contribute to premature wearing in your tires. The former creates excess wear in the center of the treads as the result of too much air pressure extending that portion of the wheel. A lot of people over inflate their tires as a temporary solution to a slow leak.

Under inflation places the wearing on the shoulders of the tire. This occurs because a lack of air pressure causes the tread to be more pliable. As such, a greater area makes contact with the road.

The Air Lift 1000 kits are engineered as an add-on helper spring for coil spring suspensions, front or rear. The polyurethane cylinders fit easily inside existing coil springs without any special tools. Air pressure can be adjusted to adapt for additional loads and to obtain desired suspension firmness.

Steps – How To Troubleshooting a Lincoln Town Car!

2010 June 9

The Lincoln Town Car’s air suspension uses a small, separate air compressor under the driver’s side left fender well, with air lines running to the air bags. On the top of each air bag is a electrical valve. This is a relief valve that allows air to be exhausted when activated, and which senses the amount of air pressure within the air bag to keep both sides equal.

These valves are operated via a leveling sensor that is attached to the body of the car and to the rear axle by a movable arm. When the rear of the car drops due to increased load, the arm is pushed up. When the arm is pushed up, it turns on the air compressor and fills the air bags to level the car. When the load is removed and the arm moves down, indicating that the back of the car has risen, the sensor opens the valve on the air bags and allows air to escape, lowering the car.

If the back of the car is low, indicating that the air suspension is not working, and the air suspension light is on, check the fuse first. If the fuse is all right, check the air suspension switch in the trunk and make sure it is on. This switch is used when the car is in for service. Always turn off the switch before lifting the car, because the sensor will think the car is rising and keep the air bag valves open, ruining the rear air suspension.

Turn the ignition key with the engine off. Listen for the compressor to come on while pushing down on the rear bumper. If it does not come on, test the switch terminals for power, using a circuit tester. If one terminal has power and the other does not, replace the switch. If there is power, turn the switch to the off position, raise the vehicle and place it on jack stands in the rear.

Inspect the leveling switch on the axle, making sure it is not bent and is connected. Use an ohmmeter for this test. Pull the electrical connector off the switch. Loosen the arm of the switch from the axle. Test the switch with the ohmmeter by checking across both terminals while slowly moving the arm. There should be no continuity with the arm down. As the arm is raised, there should be continuity. If not, replace the switch. If there was continuity, connect the arm and the electrical connector.

Put a floor jack under the axle and raise the axle to the point where it is just beginning to lift the car off the jack stand. Turn on the ignition. Turn the air suspension switch to the “on” position. Use the circuit tester to check for power at the leveling switch. If there is power, turn the air suspension switch to “off” and lower the car. Access the air compressor in the front, under the hood, and check the electrical connector for power. If there is power, check for a good ground. If both are good, replace the compressor. If the compressor works and the car does not rise in the back, replace the air bags.

Lincoln Town Car Replacing Airbags and Compressor!

2010 June 7

The Lincoln Town Car commonly needs air suspension work around 80 to 120k miles. What happens at this point is the bags usually wear out on the bottom part of the bag. You will not to be able to see this wear with the bags in the car, you will have to remove them and fully extend them. Lincoln Town Car Airbags are the same as most airbags, functionality wise. Once these bags rub together at the bottom for long enough, they will eventually wear through the chord, and leak.

So now you need new bags. In most cases people don’t know they are leaking for a little while, or if they do they ignore it. You may notice the air compressor running sometimes, as it has to keep adding air as air leaks out of the bags. Eventually the air compressor will fail due to being overworked, in an attempt to keep air in those leaky airbags. So one approach is to check your airbags as you get close to 80k miles. And keep an eye on them so you know when it is time for a new set of airbags. That will save you the cost of a Lincoln town car air compressor, which isn’t cheap.

If its to late, I have one other solution for you, that will resolve all your town car air suspension problems, for good. The solution is a Four Wheel Coil Conversion Kit, this will completely replace all your air suspensions parts. Everything from airbags, lines, compressor, and solenoids will no longer be needed. Instead these parts will be replaced with coil springs, which are much more reliable than and air suspensions system.

This can also help with other air suspension problems for a Lincoln. Not just necessarily a town car. For instance, say you’re having 1998 Lincoln navigator air suspension problems, you can fix that with this method as well. Air suspension conversion kits are known to be very faulty. They tend to mess up a lot. That is why it is a good idea to invest in a coil conversion kit.

1990 Lincoln Town Car 4-Wheel Air Suspension Conversion Kit w/ Shocks

2010 June 2

When you purchase your Airsuspension Lincoln Towncar Conversion Kit you will receive Roadside Assistance Free of Charge for 1 Full Year. It’s our way of giving you additional peace of mind for you and your family.

Free Roadside Assistance is only available for purchases made online at Airsuspension.com.  Airsuspension is dedicated to delivering value above and beyond anyone in the automotive industry.

Our 4-Wheel coil spring conversion kit was exclusively designed for your Lincoln Town Car. This kit not only converts your rear air suspension system to a reliable coil spring non-air suspension system, it also replaces the worn out front coil springs as well.

Our Town Car front and rear springs are designed to give you that new ride feel, comparable to the factory suspension. This Kit also includes 2 front and 2 rear high quality shock absorbers to replace the old worn shocks.

All 4 springs fit perfectly without welding or modifying the original suspension on your Town Car. The rear springs included are red, powder coated, variable rate coil springs that are made in America.

The front springs are also made in America and color may vary. Also the 4 shocks included are the highest quality aftermarket shocks available. We also include detailed instructions to make installation quick and easy. Save money and get back on the road fast!

Our  coil spring conversion kit with shocks was exclusively designed for your Lincoln Town Car. This kit converts your rear air suspension system to a reliable coil spring non-air suspension system. Our Town Car springs and rear shocks are designed to give you that new ride feel, comparable to the factory air suspension.  The springs fit perfectly without welding or modifying the original suspension on your Town Car. AirSuspension.com is your one stop shop for all Lincoln Towncar air suspension parts and suspension conversion kits.

Lincoln Navigator Deluxe 4-Wheel Air Suspension Conversion Kit!

2010 May 27

The Lincoln Navigator air suspension system is subject to many problems, but it’s biggest enemy is time. The air springs are made from rubber components which dry-rot in approximately 3 to 7 years. The Navigator air suspension’s longevity is determined by how much extreme heat and cold weather your Lincoln Navigator is subjected to.

These severe conditions degrade the air ride suspension components of the air suspension system. Many times the electronic devices (modules and sensors) begin to fail with age as well. This is a recipe for disaster and compounds the suspension problems related to the factory Lincoln Navigator suspension system.

Also overlooked many times on the Lincoln Navigator is the condition of the front suspension of the vehicle. In the same span of time, the Navigator front suspension is subject to extreme wear and the poor shock and spring quality will make it difficult to properly align the vehicle and this causes excessive wear and tear on the front tires and eventually eliminates the great ride you deserve as a Lincoln Navigator owner.

The good news is…you can avoid these high costs and the frustration by installing the AirSuspension.com air suspension conversion kit system. Our suspension solution replaces all four corners of your Lincoln Navigator air suspension with the highest quality, passive suspension parts.

Our suspension conversion kits come with a lifetime warranty, our low price guarantee, and free roadside assistance for one full year. Our Lincoln Navigator air suspension conversion kits are simple and easy to install. Save money and get back on the road fast!

AirSuspension.com is your one stop shop for all Lincoln Navigator air suspension parts and suspension conversion kits. Find Lincoln Navigator Monroe shock absorbers, struts, shocks, air springs, coil springs, air bags, air shocks, conversion kits, coil over air suspensions, air ride suspension conversions, helper springs, ride control suspension, suspension air compressors, air bag suspension components and Lincoln Navigator air ride suspension products. Have a suspension problem with your Lincoln Navigator rear suspension or front suspension? AirSuspension.com can help.

How A Car’s Suspension System Works!

2010 May 23

The quest for the smoothest ride is likened to King Arthur’s quest for the Holy Grail: endlessly pursued yet somehow elusive. But, by upgrading your vehicle with an air suspension system, you can quickly realize nirvana through driving bliss.

A car’s suspension system is like a public school teacher: overworked and under-appreciated systems. It has to support the weight of the car, including passengers and cargo, while allowing the tires and wheels to move up and down to minimize impacts from cracks, bumps and the other numerous imperfections in the road. Your suspension also prevents excessive body squat and dive during acceleration and braking. There are a number of suspension systems on the market, but without question, air suspension remains the most popular.

Air shocks are powered by an engine-driven or electric air compressor and continue to be wildly popular among those in the know. The compressor pressurizes air and uses it to replace conventional steel springs. An air bag suspension provides a smoother ride and is fully adjustable, allowing drivers to tweak each wheel’s air pressure individually and even tilt the vehicle side to side or front to back to level it out. The air cushion softens the contact between the axle and the frame to reduce bottoming out, and they provide between 500 – 5,000 lbs of load-leveling capacity depending on your vehicle and the type of air suspension you get.

Most air compressor kits are a complete solution for upgrading your suspension, including the air compressor, manifold, wiring harness, control box and some that even feature a 5-gallon air tank that fills with 200psi in less than 40 seconds.

A performance grade air suspension kit is the Road Runner of the auto world: pretty much unbeatable. And since we live in the time of tech, many air compressors can be controlled by a wireless remote from inside the cab of your vehicle. This innovative system makes adjusting your air springs from inside (or outside) your cab simple-just push a button, and you’re off. Plus, the wireless design means you won’t have a nest of wires running through your cab.

Many air suspension systems feature advanced diagnostics to provide complete control of your air shocks. In addition, many systems provide a setting for user-defined memory, allowing you to quickly switch between your most frequently used settings.

One word of advice: don’t be tempted by generic parts. When it comes to your suspension system, the best kits are those that have been personally-tailored to your unique make, model and year, providing all the components required for a quick and easy do-it-yourself installation. Nothing’s worse than getting half-way through a suspension upgrade only to find out the kit you ordered is missing some key component, like the air compressor or the air lines.

Discover How to Remove the Rear Shock From a Lincoln Town Car!

2010 May 19

The Lincoln Town Car’s air suspension uses a small, separate air compressor under the driver’s side left fender well, with air lines running to the air bags. On the top of each air bag is a electrical valve. This is a relief valve that allows air to be exhausted when activated, and which senses the amount of air pressure within the air bag to keep both sides equal.

These valves are operated via a leveling sensor that is attached to the body of the car and to the rear axle by a movable arm. When the rear of the car drops due to increased load, the arm is pushed up. When the arm is pushed up, it turns on the air compressor and fills the air bags to level the car. When the load is removed and the arm moves down, indicating that the back of the car has risen, the sensor opens the valve on the air bags and allows air to escape, lowering the car.

If the back of the car is low, indicating that the air suspension is not working, and the air suspension light is on, check the fuse first. If the fuse is all right, check the air suspension switch in the trunk and make sure it is on. This switch is used when the car is in for service. Always turn off the switch before lifting the car, because the sensor will think the car is rising and keep the air bag valves open, ruining the rear air suspension.

Turn the ignition key with the engine off. Listen for the compressor to come on while pushing down on the rear bumper. If it does not come on, test the switch terminals for power, using a circuit tester. If one terminal has power and the other does not, replace the switch. If there is power, turn the switch to the off position, raise the vehicle and place it on jack stands in the rear. Inspect the leveling switch on the axle, making sure it is not bent and is connected. Use an ohmmeter for this test. Pull the electrical connector off the switch.

Loosen the arm of the switch from the axle. Test the switch with the ohmmeter by checking across both terminals while slowly moving the arm. There should be no continuity with the arm down. As the arm is raised, there should be continuity. If not, replace the switch. If there was continuity, connect the arm and the electrical connector.

Put a floor jack under the axle and raise the axle to the point where it is just beginning to lift the car off the jack stand. Turn on the ignition. Turn the air suspension switch to the “on” position. Use the circuit tester to check for power at the leveling switch. If there is power, turn the air suspension switch to “off” and lower the car. Access the air compressor in the front, under the hood, and check the electrical connector for power. If there is power, check for a good ground. If both are good, replace the compressor. If the compressor works and the car does not rise in the back, replace the air bags.

Shock Absorbers Replacement Parts For Lincoln Mark VII

2010 May 12

The Lincoln Mark VII is a vehicle that is from the Ford Motor Company’s Lincoln division of luxury cars and vehicles. Before it was known as the Lincoln Mark VII, this vehicle actually was called and named as the Lincoln Mark VII Air Suspension Parts. Since it holds the Lincoln brand, it has been crafted to be a luxury car and it has been designed to be a large car. In fact, it has been produced as a coupe with an installed rear wheel drive system.

The lifespan of the Lincoln Mark VII started in 1984. Production for this vehicle continued up until 1992. The vacant spot and the niche in automobile history that the Lincoln Mark VII left behind were filled come the following year when the Lincoln Mark VII Rear Air Suspension took that spot. The platform that the Lincoln Mark VII is mounted and constructed on is actually the very same platform that has already been used in other vehicles from the Ford Motor Company. This includes the Ford Thunderbird, the Ford Mustang, and the Lincoln Continental. During the period that the Lincoln Mark VII was introduced and that same period when this vehicle still roamed the streets, it has been said that the Lincoln Mark VII held the most high technology features when it came to comfort and convenience.

This was when the vehicle was compared to all the other vehicles out in the market that time. These high class features included power accessories like the power windows, power locks, and power seating. The vehicle also held leather seating, a key less entry system installed, an on board computer and message center, as well as digital instruments and gauges. The fact is that you can save major dollars, sometimes two or three thousand, by using Suspension conversion kits. Lincoln Mark VII Shock Absorbers Replacement parts are well engineered and a provide a great ride. Some others use springs that are made for another car purchased at the local parts store. These springs are modified, heated, re-bent and forced to fit on your car. Re-heating springs later leads to collapse and failure. Failure leads to another trip to the repair shop and more expense.

Lincoln LS Suspension Parts Are Revealed!

2010 April 30

When the Lincoln LS was first introduced, it was heralded as the domestic answer to the premium mid size sedans from Europe’s luxury brands. At the time, the rear-drive LS had the look and the technology to compete with Europe’s best in a way few American cars could. Early reviews pegged it as a 10 in terms of fun to drive, and some described it as a car that offered the roominess of a BMW 5 Series at the price of a 3 Series.

The LS had the option of a V6 or V8 and, thanks to its rear-wheel-drive configuration and well-tuned Lincoln LS suspension, was reasonably entertaining on a back road. But as good as the LS seemed initially, the car became less appealing over the years as the ranks of newer, more competent and more luxurious entry-luxury sedans grew. With sales slowing, Lincoln discontinued the LS after the 2006 model year.

Though lacking a little in terms of prestige and refinement, the Lincoln LS is still a respectable choice for a used luxury sedan with sporting tendencies. Its pricing is lower than many competing models, and maintenance costs should also be slightly lower than those of some European cars, but don’t expect the LS to be as trouble-free as its competitors from Japan.

A mid-size entry-luxury sedan, the Lincoln LS was produced for the 2000-’06 model years. Originally, the LS was available in just two trim levels differentiated by the engine equipped. The Lincoln LS V8 came with a 252-horsepower, 3.9-liter engine that moved the sedan from zero to 60 in 7.5 seconds. A five-speed automatic transmission was standard.

The less expensive choice was the LS V6. Its 3.0-liter engine provided just 210 hp but slightly better fuel economy. For this engine, Lincoln initially offered either a five-speed manual transmission or a five-speed automatic.

Standard features for both cars included dual-zone automatic climate control, a power tilt-and-telescoping steering wheel, alloy wheels, foglights and ABS. However, a few upscale items, such as a navigation system, weren’t initially offered.

At the time, we found that V8 versions of the Lincoln LS Air Suspension delivered smooth and acceptable acceleration. The ride was comfortable and compliant, and the LS was at its best when being used as a touring sedan rather than an all-out sport sedan. Notably, it was roomy enough to provide comfortable quarters for four adults. The interior materials were lacking in terms of quality, though, and storage space was minimal in the cabin.

Early models had automatic transmission problems, so it might be wise to avoid them on the used market. Even when that issue was addressed by Lincoln, shifts from the automatic were not exactly smooth and many customers still complained. For this reason, we’d advise any prospective LS buyer to do a thorough test-drive before making a purchase.

For 2003, Lincoln did its first major update on its mid size luxury sedan. Output for the V8 was raised to 280 hp, and the V6 added 12 hp for a total of 222. The five-speed manual that was available with the V6 was dropped due to lack of consumer interest.

Other changes that year included returned steering (resulting in better feel), a returned suspension parts (resulting in a slightly softer ride) and improved interior materials and storage. New features were also added, such as a navigation system, side curtain airbags and a THX sound system. To make the most of your used-car dollar, we suggest looking at 2003 or newer LS models.

A few other changes occurred before the Lincoln LS was discontinued. Satellite radio was added as a dealer-installed option for 2004, and Lincoln made additional improvements to the automatic transmission to improve shift quality. For the final year, the V6 version was dropped from the LS lineup.